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CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT
Actual Estimate
Notional
Budget Authority (in $ millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2013 President's Budget Request
2,956.4
2,993.9
2,847.5
2,847.5
2,847.5
2,847.5
2,847.5
Center M angement and Operations
2,189.0
2,204.1
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
Agency M angement and Operations
767.4
789.8
754.2
754.2
754.2
754.2
754.2
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT OVERVIEW .................... CAS- 2
CENTER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
Center Management and Operations
CAS- 5
Technical Authority
CAS- 9
AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS ....................... CAS- 11
Agency Management
CAS- 13
Safety and Missions Success
CAS- 17
Agency IT Services
CAS- 24
Strategic Capabilities Assets Program
CAS- 28
HEADQUARTERS BUDGET BY OFFICE ............................ CAS- 33
HEADQUARTERS TRAVEL BUDGET BY OFFICE .................. CAS- 34
HEADQUARTERS FTE ASSIGNMENT BY OFFICE ................ CAS- 35
CAS-1
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT (CAS)
FY 2013 BUDGET
Actual Estimate
Notional
Budget Authority (in $ millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2013 President's Budget Request
2,956.4
2,993.9
2,847.5
2,847.5
2,847.5
2,847.5
2,847.5
Center M anagement and Operations
2,189.0
2,204.1
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
Agency M anagement and Operations
767.4
789.8
754.2
754.2
754.2
754.2
754.2
Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-146.4
Percent Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-4.9%
Note: FY 2011 actuals have been adjusted for comparability. FY 2011 actuals are reduced to show the realignment of Innovative Partnerships
Program to the Space Technology account.
CAS provides critical mission support capabilities
necessary to maintain the operation and administration
of the Agency that cannot be directly aligned to
specific program or project requirements. The mission
support functions align to and sustain institutional
capabilities for supporting NASA's mission portfolio
by leveraging resources to meet mission needs,
establishing Agency-wide capabilities, and providing
institutional checks and balances. CAS institutional
capabilities ensure that Agency operations are
effective and efficient and that activities are
conducted in accordance with all statutory, regulatory,
and fiduciary responsibilities. CAS program
The Space Power Facility is the world's largest
capabilities ensure that vital skills and assets are ready
vacuum chamber, 100 ft. in diameter by 122 ft.
and available to meet technical milestones for
high, in which large space-bound hardware can be
programs and projects, that missions and research are
tested by simulating environmental conditions
encountered in space. In support of NASA's diverse
technically and scientifically sound, and that Agency
missions, Space Power Facility test programs have
practices adhere to standards and processes that
included high-energy experiments, rocket-fairing
separation tests, Mars Lander system tests,
provide safety and reliability through proper
deployable Solar Sail tests and ISS hardware tests.
management of risk.
NASA's CAS account includes two themes: Center Management and Operations (CMO) and Agency
Management and Operations (AMO).
CAS-2
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT (CAS)
EXPLANATION OF MAJOR CHANGES FOR FY 2013
In FY 2013, the CAS account reflects a reduction of $146.4 million compared to the FY 2012 estimated
level. This decrease in funding represents a reduction in basic Center and Headquarter services, such as
facilities maintenance and repair and IT services. NASA will partially offset the decrease by savings
achieved through the implementation of the Administration's Campaign to Cut Waste and Executive
Order 13589, "Promoting Efficient Spending" across all Centers and Headquarters.
ACHIEVEMENTS IN FY 2011
In FY 2011, NASA initiated a Technical Capabilities Assessment Task to actively take steps towards
right-sizing the Agency's infrastructure. Centers have since taken significant steps towards realigning
their infrastructure to new mission requirements.
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS PLANNED FOR FY 2013
In FY 2013, the Mission Support Directorate will continue the reassessment of NASA technical
capabilities in addition to improving the security of the Agency's Web applications and IT security assets.
BUDGET EXPLANATION
The FY 2013 request is $2,847.5 million. This represents a $146.4 million decrease from the FY 2012
estimate ($2,993.9 million). The FY 2013 request includes:
*
$2,093.3 million for CMO that funds the ongoing management, operations, and maintenance of
all NASA Centers.
*
$754.2 million for AMO that provides functional and administrative oversight for the Agency,
including NASA Headquarters operations.
Themes
CENTER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS (CMO)
CMO directly supports Agency programs and projects that reside at and are executed by NASA Centers.
This theme provides for the care of institutional assets, establishing and maintaining the staff and their
competencies, and the maintenance and operation of facilities required by current and future programs
and projects at the Centers. Center Institutional Capabilities provides resources, oversees the assignment
CAS-3
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT (CAS)
of workforce and facilities, and manages Center operations. Center Program Capabilities sustains the
technical facilities, workforce expertise and skills, equipment, tools, and other resources required to
facilitate program and project execution.
AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS (AMO)
AMO provides for the management and oversight of Agency missions, programs, functions and
performance of NASA-wide mission support activities. AMO activities at NASA Headquarters ensure
that core services are ready and available Agency-wide for performing mission roles and responsibilities,
Agency operations are effective and efficient, and activities are conducted in accordance with all
statutory, regulatory, and fiduciary requirements.
CAS-4
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT
CENTER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS (CMO)
FY 2013 BUDGET
Actual Estimate
Notional
Budget Authority (in $ millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2013 President's Budget Request
2,189.0
2,204.1
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
2,093.3
Center Institutional Capabilities
1,710.8
1,703.4
1,628.5
1,623.6
1,617.0
1,606.7
1,594.2
Center Programmatic Capabilities
478.1
500.7
464.8
469.7
476.3
486.6
499.1
Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-110.8
Percent Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-5.0%
NASA's CMO budget request funds the
ongoing management, operations, and
maintenance of nine NASA Centers,
including three major component facilities in
10 states. The CMO budget enables NASA
to execute its mission at the Centers by
providing the resources required to
effectively oversee the assignment of
workforce and facilities. Center operations
facilitate program and project execution
while ensuring that statutory, regulatory, and
fiduciary compliance requirements are met.
NASA is comprised of its Headquarters in Washington, DC,
nine Centers across the country, and JPL, a federally funded
CMO funds a wide variety of essential
research and development center operated under a contract
operations, including Center security,
with the California Institute of Technology. Other NASA
environmental management and safety
facilities include: Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, OH,
managed by GRC; the Software Independent Verification
services, facility maintenance, and
and Validation Facility (IV&V), Fairmont, WV, and Wallops
operations. Operations budgets provide
Flight Facility (WFF), Wallops, VA, both managed by GSFC;
utilities, IT services, legal, and occupational
Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF), New Orleans, LA,
managed by MSFC; and the White Sands Test Facility
health, equal employment opportunity, and
(WSTF) and Space Network, White Sands, NM, managed by
human resource services to support
JSC.
Agency's Center-based civil servants.
Operations also includes Center management, and support for Agency-wide technical and logistics
requirements, (e.g. science, engineering and technical authority staff and resources). CMO consists of two
project level funding, Center Institutional Capability and Center Program Capability.
CAS-5
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT
CENTER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS (CMO)
CENTER INSTITUTIONAL CAPABILITY
Center Institutional Capability encompasses a diverse set of activities including financial and human
capital management, acquisition services, facility maintenance, utilities, information technology, and
safety and security. This capability manages and sustains the Center staff, facilities, and operations
required for program and project execution. It also provides for the ongoing operations of NASA Centers,
including three major component facilities, ensuring a safe, healthy, and environmentally responsible
workplace. The Agency's coordinated approach to institutional management is an essential element in
preserving unique national capabilities relied upon by NASA, industry, academia, and other government
agencies.
NASA'S participation in the Administration's Campaign to Cut Waste will result in $200 million in
savings in administrative costs. Agency-wide in FY 2013 compared to FY 2010 levels. However,
contractor labor, utility, and operations costs continue to grow at a higher rate than inflation. The FY 2013
budget request will offset these increases by implementing additional cost savings reductions to travel,
printing, reproduction, and other administrative costs, bringing the Center Institutional Capability request
to approximately three percent ($48M) higher than the FY 2008 budget level.
CENTER PROGRAM CAPABILITY
NASA's Center Program Capability supports the Agency's scientific and engineering activities by
providing engineering assessment and safety oversight pertaining to the technical readiness and execution
of NASA programs and projects. It also sustains NASA's analysis, design, research, test services, and
fabrication capabilities enabling efficient execution of the programs and projects hosted at the Centers. A
key component of NASA's overall system of checks and balances is provided within Technical
Capabilities through formally delegated Technical Authorities. The Technical Authorities at NASA's
Centers provide independent oversight and review of programs and projects in support of safety and
mission success. This is to assure that NASA's activities are safely implemented in accordance with
accepted standards of professional practice and applicable NASA requirements.
EXPLANATION OF PROGRAM CHANGES
The CMO budget reflects reductions of basic Center support, including planned facilities maintenance
and repair, custodial, IT, financial management, and similar support activities.
The program also reflects consolidation of Agency-wide IT contracts under AMO Agency Information
Technology Services (AITS).
CAS-6
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT
CENTER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS (CMO)
ACHIEVEMENTS IN FY 2011
The Mission Support Directorate initiated the NASA Technical Capabilities Assessment Task to actively
take steps towards right-sizing the Agency's infrastructure, as directed by the NASA Authorization Act of
2010. These efforts are being aligned with the on-going activities to re-scope the Agency's capabilities as
part of the transition from the Space Shuttle and the Constellation Systems Programs. In FY 2011, the
Centers have taken numerous steps towards realigning their infrastructure to new mission requirements.
Langley Research Center: The Agency approved the decision to shut down the CF4 and the Unitary
Planned wind tunnels beginning in FY 2012.
Johnson Space Center: Mission support approved the decision to shut down the JSC Arc Jet Facility in
FY 2013. The Agency plans to utilize the Arc Jet Facility at ARC, consolidating entry descent and
landing related testing. JSC will close the facility following the completion of planned testing in FY 2012.
White Sands Test Facility (WSTF): As a result of the conclusion of the Space Shuttle Program, the
rocket propulsion testing (RPT) facilities at WSTF are currently being transitioned. In FY 2013, three
facilities will remain active, five will be closed, and one will be put in inactive standby.
Marshall Space Flight Center: Pending historical considerations, MSFC plans to demolish
approximately 33 structures through FY 2017 and transition through FY 2012 approximately 40 buildings
to a shut down/standby status. This includes facilities no longer needed for the cancelled Constellation
Systems program.
Kennedy Space Center: The Center plans to abandon, return to the U.S. Air Force, or find alternate
entities to utilize the following infrastructures: Hypergol Maintenance Facility, Processing Control
Center, Orbiter Processing Facility, Parachute Refurbishment Facility, Hangar M Annex, Hangar S,
Hangar AF, Solid Rocket Booster recovery ships, and Mobile Launch Platforms 1 and 2.
The majority of the facilities/capabilities listed are being divested as a result of the conclusion of the
Space Shuttle program. NASA/KSC has entered into an agreement with the State of Florida for the use of
the Orbiter Processing Facility Number 3 and the Processing Control Center to support ongoing
commercial space activities that the State is pursuing. As part of this agreement, the State of Florida has
taken over responsibility for the operations and maintenance of the facilities. The ultimate disposition of
the remaining NASA facilities at KSC and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station will be determined after
FY 2013 Shuttle Transition and Retirement efforts.
Stennis Space Center: The Center consolidated its Hardware Assurance Testing Contract with its Test
Operations Contract, as Space Shuttle main engine testing is no longer required. The consolidation will
reduce support contractor infrastructure and increase efficiency.
CAS-7
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT
CENTER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS (CMO)
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS PLANNED FOR FY 2013
NASA will implement an Agency-wide reduction in printing and reproduction, travel, supplies and
materials, IT devices, executive fleet, and extraneous promotional items in support of efficiency
initiatives.
Mission Support Directorate plans to continue the re-alignment efforts of Agency's infrastructure through
the NASA Technical Capabilities Assessment task. The directorate will remain engaged with programs
and Centers in re-assessing NASA's technical capabilities with respect to near and long-term
programmatic demand and realigning the infrastructure accordingly.
The Agency plans to continue consolidating the IT data centers across the NASA Centers. By the end of
FY 2013, the Agency plans to reduce the number of data centers by 53 percent from the FY 2010
baseline. This data center consolidation will result in energy savings of approximately $600 thousand per
year from the FY 2010 baseline.
BUDGET EXPLANATION
The FY 2013 request is $2,093.3 million. This represents a $110.8 million decrease from the FY 2012
estimate ($2,204.1 million). The FY 2013 request includes:
*
$1,628.5 million for Center Institutional Capabilities; and
*
$464.8 million for Center Program Capabilities.
CAS-8
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: CENTER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
TECHNICAL AUTHORITY
SMA TECHNICAL AUTHORITY
($ in millions)
Notional
Center
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
Ames Research Center
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
Dryden Flight Research Center
6.2
6.2
6.2
6.2
6.4
Glenn Research Center
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
Goddard Space Flight Center
11.5
11.5
11.5
11.5
11.5
Johnson Space Center
6.6
6.6
6.6
6.6
6.6
Kennedy Sp ace Center
10.3
10.3
10.3
10.3
10.3
Langley Research Center
3.5
3.5
3.5
3.6
3.7
M arshall Sp ace Flight Center
6.9
6.9
6.9
7.2
7.4
Stennis Sp ace Center
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
NAS A Total
52.3
52.3
52.3
52.6
53.4
ENGINEERING TECHNICAL AUTHORITY
($ in millions)
Notional
Center
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
Ames Research Center
7
7.2
7.5
7.9
8.3
Dryden Flight Research Center
6.7
6.9
7.2
7.6
7.9
Glenn Research Center
13.1
13.4
14.1
14.8
15.5
Goddard Space Flight Center
9.6
10
10.5
11
11.6
Johnson Space Center
20.5
20.5
21.4
22.5
23.5
Kennedy Sp ace Center
14.1
14.9
15.6
16.2
17.1
Langley Research Center
17.3
18
18.8
19.7
20.6
M arshall Sp ace Flight Center
35.4
35.4
35.4
35.4
35.4
Stennis Sp ace Center
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
NAS A Total
126.8
129.4
133.7
138.2
143
CAS-9
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: CENTER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
TECHNICAL AUTHORITY
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CAS-10
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT
AGENCY AND MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS (AMO)
FY 2013 BUDGET
Actual Estimate
Notional
Budget Authority (in $ millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2013 President's Budget Request
767.5
789.8
754.2
754.2
754.2
754.2
754.2
Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-35.6
Percent Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-4.5%
Note: FY 2011 actuals have been adjusted for comparability. FY 2011 actuals are reduced to show the realignment of Innovative Partnerships
Program to the Space Technology account.
AMO provides for the management and oversight of
Agency missions, programs, functions and
performance of NASA-wide mission support
activities. AMO activities at NASA Headquarters
ensure that core services are ready and available
Agency-wide for performing mission roles and
responsibilities, Agency operations are effective and
efficient, and activities are conducted in accordance
with all statutory, regulatory, and fiduciary
requirements.
NASA Headquarters develops policy and guidance
for the Centers and provides strategic planning and
The Office of the Chief Engineer, and the NASA
Engineering and Safety Center are key to NASA's
leadership. Headquarters establishes Agency-wide
program excellence. OCE ensures missions are
requirements and capabilities that improve
planned and conducted with sound engineering and
management practices, and the NESC taps technical
collaboration, efficiency, and effectiveness. Agency
expertise within NASA and from external partners.
management leverages resources and capabilities to
Both enabled the Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor
meet mission needs, eliminate excess capacity, and
test to capture precise measures of deformation on a
fully-instrumented massive 27.5-foot-diameter, 20-
scale assets accordingly. Centers establish programs
foot-tall barrel during combined axial compression
and initiatives to maximize individual and
and bending tests. Results suggested NASA's next
generation launch vehicles may be modified to
organizational capabilities.
significantly reduce weight and cost, lessening
development and performance risks.
AMO provides for policy-setting, executive
management, and direction for all essential corporate
functions such as human capital, finance, IT, infrastructure, procurement, legal counsel, protective
services, occupational health and safety, equal opportunity and diversity, small business programs,
external relations, and strategic communications. AMO also supports the operational costs of the
Headquarters installation. The AMO theme is divided into four programs: Agency Management, SMS,
AITS, and SCAP.
CAS-11
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT
AGENCY AND MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS (AMO)
EXPLANATION OF PROGRAM CHANGES
There are no programmatic changes.
ACHIEVEMENTS IN FY 2011
The NASA Management Office at JPL, in partnership with the city of Pasadena, completed construction
and began operation of a new 7000 gallons-per-minute groundwater treatment plant, which provides
drinking water to city customers. This plant serves to clean up chemicals in the groundwater for which
NASA is responsible and returns use of the aquifer to the city for water supply purposes.
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS PLANNED FOR FY 2013
Consistent with the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the SMS program will enhance its orbital debris
and counterfeit parts tracking and reporting programs. Counterfeit electrical components may cause
failure resulting in loss of a mission or, in the case of manned missions, loss of life.
During FY 2013, NASA will continue to expand its capabilities to improve the security and safeguard of
Web applications and IT security assets, enhance Security Operations Center (SOC) capabilities, and
expand real-time continuous monitoring and risk management capabilities.
BUDGET EXPLANATION
The FY 2013 request is $754.2 million. This represents a $35.6 million decrease from the FY 2012
estimate ($789.8 million). The FY 2013 request includes:
*
$391.8 million for Agency Management to provide management and oversight of Agency
missions, programs, and functions of NASA-wide mission support activities;
*
$182.4 million for SMS (including IV&V) which includes NASA Headquarters programs
providing technical excellence, mission assurance, and technical authority;
*
$152.0 million for AITS to ensure IT excellence to achieve success of NASA missions; and
*
$28.0 million for SCAP which includes ensuring test facilities identified as essential by the
Agency are in a state of readiness. This supports the core capabilities of thermal vacuum
chambers, simulators, and the Arc Jet Facility.
CAS-12
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
AGENCY MANAGEMENT
FY 2013 BUDGET
Actual Estimate
Notional
Budget Authority (in $ millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2013 President's Budget Request
401.9
403.2
391.8
391.8
391.8
391.8
391.8
Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-11.4
Percent Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
0.0
Note: FY 2011 actuals have been adjusted for comparability. FY 2011 actuals are reduced to show the realignment of Innovative Partnerships
Program to the Space Technology account.
Agency Management provides governance and
functional and administrative management oversight
for the Agency and operational support for NASA
Headquarters. This program function primarily
supports ongoing operations. Agency Management
support reflects the activities required for being in
business in the Federal sector and provides the
capability to respond to legislation and other
mandates (for example, the Homeland Security
Policy Directive -12, the universal identification
standard that streamlines access to buildings and
computer networks). Other examples of legislation
and mandates to which the Agency must comply and
provide assessments include the Freedom of
Information Act and Equal Employment Opportunity
compliance with Section 508 for IT. The Agency
NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., provides
Management program supports over 35 discrete
overall planning and policy direction for
Headquarters and the corporate management for the
operations and mission support projects with over
all its field centers, which includes at least 41,000 civil
210 separate activity line items.
servant employees and on and near site contractors
NASA-wide.
Agency Management provides policies, controls, and
oversight across a range of functional and administrative management service areas. Agency Management
governance and oversight activities include finance, protective services, general counsel, public affairs,
external relations, legislative affairs, training, human capital, procurement, real property and
infrastructure, budget management, systems support, internal controls, diversity, equal opportunity,
independent program and cost evaluation, and small business programs.
NASA is taking proactive steps to manage the daily operational activities for maximum efficiency and
effectiveness within the allocated fund control levels.
CAS-13
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
AGENCY MANAGEMENT
The Agency Management program supports operational activities of Headquarters as an installation.
These activities include building lease costs, facility operations costs (such as physical security,
maintenance, logistics, information technology hardware, and software costs), and automated business
systems implementation, and operations costs like initiatives related to transparency and accountability in
government.
Agency Management activities are performed at NASA Headquarters, with critical support provided by
the NASA Centers. Distributed Agency Management activities are also performed at the NASA
Management Office at the JPL, JHU-APL, and the NASA Shared Services Center (NSSC) at SSC.
EXPLANATION OF MAJOR CHANGES FOR FY 2013
There are no program changes.
ACHIEVEMENTS IN FY 2011
To facilitate the assessment of Agency's technical capabilities, the Agency developed a new database
tool, the NASA Technical Capabilities Database. The purpose of the database is to house the information
concerning the supply of Center-respective technical capabilities and their associated resources and to
map them to projected mission demand across the Agency as part of the NASA Technical Capabilities
task. The task aims to balance the institutional capabilities with the needs of the Agency's future
missions.
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS PLANNED FOR FY 2013
Agency Management will deliver policies, controls, and oversight across a range of functional and
administrative management service areas, and provide independent assessments and strategic planning
services. Agency Management will also direct activities in procurement, finance, human capital, real
property and infrastructure, protective services, diversity, equal opportunity, and small business.
BUDGET EXPLANATION
The FY 2013 request is $391.8 million. This represents a $11.4 million decrease from the FY 2012
estimate ($403.2 million).
The FY 2013 request includes $391.8 million for ongoing functional and administrative management
oversight for the Agency and operational support for NASA Headquarters, as an installation, through the
more than 35 discrete operations and mission support projects. Some specific requirements include
CAS-14
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
AGENCY MANAGEMENT
overseeing and managing the renovation of the headquarters building as a result of the lease renewal in
FY 2011 and bringing the building up to the silver level of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) building.
Projects
The Agency Management budget encompasses the costs of operating and commissioning NASA
Headquarters as a Center. This includes the management and sustainment of the Headquarters employees
and contractors, facilities, and operations required for program and institutional execution. The Agency
Management budget also supports a diverse set of activities and projects at both the Agency and Center
levels and includes the following:
*
IT and communications infrastructure hardware and software acquisitions and maintenance, and
contracted services for IT support;
*
Facility operations support, including physical security, custodial, and maintenance services;
equipment; expendable supplies; mail services; printing and graphics; motor pool operations;
logistics services; emergency preparedness;
*
Human resources staffing; employee payroll and benefits processing; retirement services;
employee training; employee occupational health/fitness and medical services; and grants awards
processing;
*
Headquarters operations costs, including support provided by GSFC for accounting and
procurement operations; operations support; configuration maintenance; automated business and
administrative systems; contract close-out services; and payments to the Office of Naval Research
for grants management;
*
Human resources at both the Headquarters and Agency Equal Employment Offices (EEO), which
engage the Agency in proactive equal opportunity and diversity-inclusion initiatives in NASA-
funded science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and related programs in
contributing to the Agency's STEM workforce development; and alternate dispute resolution
services and complaint investigations;
*
The Chief Financial Officer (CFO), who upholds strong strategic planning, budget and financial
management and accountability practices, while providing timely, accurate, and reliable
information, and enhancing internal controls;
*
The Office of Protective Services, which includes policy formulation; oversight, coordination and
management of NASA protective services operations, including security, fire, emergency
management, and emergency preparedness; support for Agency counterintelligence and counter-
terrorism activities; implementation of the identity, credentials and access management systems
and other security systems, including communications; continuity of operations; and national
intelligence community services; and
CAS-15
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
AGENCY MANAGEMENT
*
The Office of Strategic Infrastructure, which provides technical expertise and oversight of
Agency infrastructure and management systems for: aircraft, environmental, real property,
logistics, and strategic capabilities programs.
In FY 2011, the Agency received a clean audit opinion of its accounting and financial systems, the first
clean opinion in nine years. Under the leadership of the Office of Human Capital Management, NASA
was again recognized as one of the top five agencies for which to work, as determined by the Partnership
for Public Performance.
To provide the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information concerning NASA
activities, the Office of Communications maintained the http://www.nasa.gov Web site, which was
honored with its third consecutive Webby Award, the industry's highest honor for the most popular Web
site in Federal Government.
CAS-16
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
SAFETY AND MISSION SUCCESS (SMS)
FY 2013 BUDGET
Actual Estimate
Notional
Budget Authority (in $ millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2013 President's Budget Request
191.2
198.2
182.4
182.4
182.4
182.4
182.4
Safety and M ission Assurance
48.1
49.4
47.8
47.8
47.8
47.8
47.8
Chief Engineer
99.2
105.2
98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6
98.6
Chief Health and Medical Officer
4.0
4.5
4.3
4.3
4.3
4.3
4.3
Independent Verification and Validation
39.9
39.1
31.7
31.7
31.7
31.7
31.7
Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-15.8
Percent Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-8.0%
SMS includes NASA Headquarters programs
providing technical excellence, mission assurance, and
technical authority. SMS also includes the corporate
work managed by the Office of the Safety and
Mission Assurance and its NASA Safety Center
(NSC) and IV&V Facility, the Office of Chief
Engineer (OCE) (including the NASA Engineering
and Safety Center, or NESC), and the Office of the
Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO). The
elements of SMS reflect the recommendations of
many studies, boards, and panels. These programs
directly support NASA's core values and serve to
improve the likelihood for safety and mission success
for NASA's programs, projects, and operations while
protecting the health and safety of NASA's workforce.
SMS develops policy and procedural requirements. It
provides recommendations to the Administrator,
mission directorates, Center Directors, and program
managers who, due to their line management
Knowing the remaining life of a pressure vessel is a
responsibilities, are ultimately accountable for the
critical safety issue for all commercial, civil, and
military missions that use composite pressure
safety and mission success of all NASA activities and
vessels (fire, naval, residential, land transportation,
the safety and health of the workforce. SMS resources
public transportation, mining, aviation, space,
provide the foundation for NASA's system of checks
medical), NASA engineers are developing
nondestructive evaluation health monitoring
and balances, enabling the effective application of the
sensing systems for smart composite overwrapped
strategic management framework and the technical
pressure vessels to determine its remaining life. The
bottom photo shows a pressure test to catastrophic
authorities defined in NASA's Strategic Management
failure.
and Governance Handbook. SMS funding trains and
CAS-17
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
SAFETY AND MISSION SUCCESS (SMS)
maintains a competent technical workforce within the disciplines of system engineering (including system
safety, reliability, and quality) and space medicine.
Resources provided by SMS are essential for evaluating the implications on safety and mission success,
including the health and medical aspects of new requirements and departures from existing requirements.
With this funding, discipline experts analyze the criticality of the associated risk and evaluate the risk
acceptability through an established process of independent reviews and assessments. The information
and advice from these experts provides critical data that is used by the technical authorities to develop
authoritative decisions related to application of requirements on programs and projects.
EXPLANATION OF MAJOR CHANGES FOR FY 2013
There are no program changes.
ACHIEVEMENTS IN FY 2011
The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted numerous critical assessments of NASA's
highest risk projects and ensured safety and mission success. NESC assessments helped ensure the safe
retirement of the Space Shuttle and the assembly completion of ISS. NESC conducted water landing tests
for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and large-scale structural testing to reduce mass in buckling-
critical launch vehicle shell structures and help to mitigate future vehicle development risks.
NASA reviewed Space Shuttle lessons at a knowledge sharing forum on January 27, 2011, at KSC. In
addition, the Shuttle Ground Operations Lessons Learned project has identified 119 lessons that will be
archived in the Lessons Learned Information System. NASA also added to the system lesson entries with
video interviews related to Shuttle ground processing knowledge sharing.
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS PLANNED FOR FY 2013
See project details below.
BUDGET EXPLANATION
The FY 2013 request is $182.4 million. This represents a $15.8 million decrease from the FY 2012
estimate ($198.2 million). The FY 2013 request includes:
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CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
SAFETY AND MISSION SUCCESS (SMS)
*
$47.8 million for SMA, which establishes and maintains an acceptable level of technical
excellence and competence in safety, reliability, maintainability, and quality engineering within
the Agency;
*
$98.6 million for the OCE, which assures the engineering excellence of the Agency, provides
rapid, cross-Agency response to mission critical engineering issues, and develops program and
project management and systems engineering skills within the Agency;
*
$4.3 million for the OCHMO, which assures the medical technical excellence of the Agency; and
*
$31.7 million for the IV&V Facility, which performs independent software analysis activities on
NASA's most critical software systems.
SAFETY AND MISSION ASSURANCE (SMA)
SMA is responsible for establishing and maintaining an acceptable level of technical excellence and
competence in safety, reliability, maintainability, and quality engineering within the Agency. SMA
assures that the risk presented by either the lack of safety requirements or from the lack of compliance
with safety requirements is analyzed, assessed, communicated, and used for proper decision making and
risk acceptance by the appropriate organizational leader.
Fundamental to these responsibilities is the definition and execution of a robust and well-understood
methodology and process for the application of the disciplines of safety, reliability and quality in defining
the level of risk. SMA conducts a schedule of reviews and assessments that focus on the life cycle
decision milestones for crucial NASA programs and projects and safety, reliability, and quality processes.
Embodied in this program is a structured development of methodology and investigation into system
attributes that improve the probability of mission success.
NSC is an important component of SMA and is responsible for consolidating SMA efforts Agency-wide
in four key areas: SMA technical excellence, knowledge management, audits and assessments, and
mishap investigation support.
In FY 2011, SMA organizations conducted safety reviews, and when necessary, independent technical
assessments for all Space Shuttle and Launch Services Program missions. In addition, SMA experts
independently analyzed the nuclear safety risk associated with the Mars Science Laboratory mission. The
SMA project developed field programmable gate array radiation test methods now utilized by NASA
flight projects and provided nondestructive evaluation assessments of critical space components,
including composite structures, inflatable habitat structures, and cryogenic storage vessels. NASA's
Orbital Debris program, which is responsible for monitoring the orbital debris environment, providing
space vehicle risk assessments, and providing orbital debris assistance to both U.S. and international
partners, was successfully implemented. SMA project produced an Engineering Risk Assessment Abort
Assessment Guide, which documented current best practices for assessing the abort capabilities of
NASA's potential crew launch systems. The SMA project also provided over 14,000 hours of Safety and
Mission Assurance Technical Excellence training to 1,800 unique NASA learners.
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SAFETY AND MISSION SUCCESS (SMS)
In FY 2013, the SMA program will continue to conduct safety reviews and independent technical
assessments for NASA missions, including any newly selected missions using nuclear systems.
Consistent with the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, SMA will enhance its orbital debris and
counterfeit parts tracking and reporting programs. Counterfeited electrical components can cause failure
resulting in loss of mission or, in the case of human flight missions, loss of life. The SMA program will
publish assurance guidelines for the application of gallium nitride and silicon carbide semiconductor
devices in high reliability, spaceflight applications. These technologies are viewed as potential enablers
for radiation hardened and extreme temperature environment power and communication systems.
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER (OCE)
OCE promulgates policy and requirements for program and project management, for the engineering
excellence of the Agency, system engineering methodology, and the Agency's system of engineering
standards. OCE manages NESC, which is responsible for enabling rapid, cross-Agency response to
mission critical engineering, and safety issues at NASA and for improving the state of practice in critical
engineering disciplines. Established in FY 2003 in response to the Columbia accident, NESC performs
value-added independent testing, analysis, and assessments of NASA's high-risk projects to ensure safety
and mission success. SMS funding provides for the core NESC organization of senior engineering experts
from across the Agency, including the NASA Technical Fellows, and technical discipline teams
comprised of experts from NASA, industry, and academia. As an Agency-wide resource with an
independent reporting path and independent funding from the OCE, NESC helps ensure safety and
objective technical results for NASA.
OCE also sponsors the Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership to develop program and
project management and systems engineering skills. This academy provides a formal training curriculum
designed to address four career levels from recent college graduate to executive. OCE's training provides
direct support to project teams in the field through workshops, coaching, interactions with technical
experts, and through conferences, forums, and publications. In addition, OCE manages the Space Act
authorized Inventions and Contributions Board, which is chartered with recognizing and rewarding
innovation within the Agency.
In FY 2011, OCE increased awareness and usage of voluntary consensus standards, in support of OMB
Circular A-119, "Federal Participation in the Development and Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards
and in Conformity Assessment Activities."
In FY 2013, NESC will provide critical independent testing and analysis to ensure flight crew safety and
mission success as NASA transitions to the new human spaceflight programs.
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CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
SAFETY AND MISSION SUCCESS (SMS)
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF HEALTH AND MEDICAL OFFICER (OCHMO)
OCHMO promulgates Agency health and medical policy, standards, and requirements, assuring the
medical technical excellence of the Agency. OCHMO assures the physical and mental health and well-
being of the NASA workforce, and assures the safe and ethical conduct of NASA-sponsored human and
animal research. The office monitors the implementation of health and medical related requirements and
standards in all developmental human space flight programs through designated discipline experts at
NASA Centers. OCHMO provides oversight of medical and health related activities in operational human
space flight through Center-based discipline experts and clinical boards. Ongoing medical and health
discipline professionalism and licensure are supported through annual certified continuing medical
education activities and flight surgeon education. Clinical currency is maintained through OCHMO
sponsored, university-based physician training programs. NASA's biomedical research programs in
support of human space flight are guided by OCHMO-developed health and medical standards.
In FY 2011 NASA rolled out the Electronic Health Records System (EHRS) at four NASA Centers. This
tool will enhance the effectiveness of preventive exams and OSHA-required surveillance exams for
employees. This system has disaster recover back-up and mirroring capability, and will increase chart
accuracy, maintain Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-mandated privacy requirements,
and reduce potential medical errors through direct import of laboratory data via direct interface capability.
In FY 2013 NASA will have successfully completed implementation of the EHRS at all Centers,
component facilities, and JPL, as allowed by their contract. Non-attributable data is being generated and
collected on the well-being of the NASA population and will help ensure the safety of employees in all
types of exposure-related groups. The data collected over time will demonstrate trends in the health of our
NASA family and facilitate key medical decisions based on sound epidemiological data for the greatest
good of the workforce.
INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION (IV&V)
The NASA IV&V project provides software expertise, services and resources to improve the likelihood
for safety and mission success for NASA's programs, projects, and operations while protecting the health
and safety of NASA's workforce. The IV&V project analyzes mission software, independently from the
developing organization, on NASA's most critical software systems to assure safety and mission success
of those systems.
IV&V applies state-of-the-art analytical methods and techniques, complemented with effective software
engineering tools and best practices, to evaluate the correctness and quality of critical and complex
software systems throughout the project's system development life cycle.
IV&V provides resources and software expertise to other SMA elements in support of independent
evaluations of software related approaches and processes. The IV&V project supports sustaining software
CAS-21
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
SAFETY AND MISSION SUCCESS (SMS)
technical excellence in the SMA community, sustaining software domain knowledge within the SMA
organization, and in formulating software development improvement recommendations to the Agency.
Independently testing critical system software is a state-of-the-practice analytical technique that enhances
the likelihood of discovering the most difficult kinds of problems in mission software. Critical system
software problems can surface because of multiple complex interactions, under specific environmental
and operational conditions, and under unique software configurations. The IV&V program's independent
test capability enables:
*
Advanced testing and simulations of NASA's mission and safety critical software;
*
Testing and evaluation of robotics and intelligent systems;
*
Capability development within the systems engineering disciplines;
*
Central computing platform for commonly used software assurance tools by engineers; and
*
Training and education for workforce and students.
In FY 2011, NASA IV&V provided expertise to 22 projects and seven NASA Centers. IV&V provided
eight favorable launch/operational readiness votes for GRAIL, Juno, Glory, three Space Shuttle Program
launches, and two ISS software stage transitions. IV&V provides a favorable readiness vote when all
IV&V-identified issues and risks have been satisfactorily resolved by the customer.
In FY 2013, NASA will continue to provide expert software analysis on NASA's safety and mission
critical software to help assure safety and mission success. The IV&V project will continue to enhance its
technical capabilities and focus on continuous improvement and value.
Program Schedule
EHRS
Independent
implementation
assessment of
EHRS roll out
complete
mission safety
2011
2013
2013
Enhance Orbital Debris
and Counterfeit Parts
Orbital Debris
Tracking and Reporting
Program initiated
Programs
2011
2013
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CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
SAFETY AND MISSION SUCCESS (SMS)
INDEPENDENT REVIEWS
Review Type
Performer
Last Review
Purpose/Outcome
Next Review
Safety
Aerospace Safety
Evaluate NASA's safety performance and
January 2012
Advisory Panel
advises the Agency on ways to improve
(conducted
that performance.
quarterly)
CAS-23
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
AGENCY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES (AITS)
FY 2013 BUDGET
Actual
Estimate
Notional
Budget Authority (in $ millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2013 President's Budget Request
145.0
159.1
152.0
152.0
152.0
152.0
152.0
IT Management
15.0
14.6
10.5
10.5
10.5
10.5
10.5
Applications
75.3
67.8
67.8
67.8
67.8
67.8
67.8
Infrastructure
54.7
76.6
73.7
73.7
73.7
73.7
73.7
Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-7.1
Percent Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-4.5%
AITS program remains a critical enabling
capability for the Agency. The AITS program
is dedicated to ensure IT excellence so that
every mission can achieve success within
NASA's complex environment. The AITS
mission is to improve management and
security of IT systems while systematically
improving the efficiency, collaboration
capabilities, and streamlined service delivery
and visibility for the entire Agency.
The IT Infrastructure Integration Program (I3P) is
transforming NASA's IT Infrastructure services from a
AITS remains focused on centrally
center-based model to an enterprise-based management and
provisioning model. The "Discover" supercomputer will be
coordinating and integrating investments
part of the seamless, end-to-end data network designed to
built and managed by individual Centers
reduce cost, implement consistent operation procedures and
processes, and improve security. With nearly 15,000
within NASA's federated model to improve
processors and a peak performance of nearly 160 trillion
security, achieve cost efficiencies, and
operations per second, Discover is at the heart of the NASA
provide standardized services. AITS also
Center for Climate Simulation.
continues to develop and maintain NASA's
target architecture and optimization objectives. Further, AITS continuous improvement involves
transforming the infrastructure from a Center-based delivery model to one that is Agency-based through
the implementation of an IT Service model based on the Information Technology Infrastructure Library®
3.0. This is the industry's guide to applying strategic thinking to IT service management. AITS also
supports federal green IT and data center consolidation efforts. Core capabilities within AITS are the
NASA Enterprise Application Competency Center (NEACC), NASA Data Center, Security Operations
Center, and the IT Discovery and Application Management Services.
The AITS program manages NASA's Web sites and services which facilitate the Agency's statutory
requirement to disseminate information concerning its activities and missions results. NASA Web
services enhance business and technical agility, eliminate vendor specific dependencies, drive down
CAS-24
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
AGENCY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES (AITS)
operational overhead for Web presence, consolidate NASA's Web infrastructure, drive down the cost of
custom Web/on-demand services for missions, programs, and projects, increase NASA IT security,
explore shared services across NASA Centers, and improve online customer service delivery through
innovative technology. The program also implements services to allow citizens, collaborators, and other
partners to use existing social media and other accounts to access NASA systems.
Under the AITS program, the Agency continues to improve its network security with an enterprise
approach to perimeter control and maintenance, including the use of Personal Identification Verification
smartcards for remote perimeter access. In addition, AITS is consolidating several NASA Center-specific
applications into enterprise-level services, leveraging cloud offerings where possible.
The AITS program also enables NASA's mobile workforce to work anytime, anywhere using NASA
devices or personal devices while ensuring adequate security of NASA's data and information.
EXPLANATION OF MAJOR CHANGES FOR FY 2013
There are no program changes.
ACHIEVEMENTS IN FY 2011
The Agency-implemented the IT Infrastructure Integration Program (I3P). It incorporates Agency
Consolidated End-user Services, Enterprise Applications Service Technologies, Enterprise Service Desk,
and NASA Integrated Communications Services contracts, streamlines operations, gains efficiencies, and
provides expected costs savings. The key to the new IT infrastructure transformation includes the
transition from a Center-based, locally operated approach to an Agency-centralized, enterprise-based
approach to consolidate the decision authority back to the Agency Headquarters and, thereby, centralize
decisions and maximize efficiencies and cost savings. For example, NASA has reduced the total number
of data centers from 79 to 54, which resulted in the reduction of energy costs through more efficient use
of the existing conditioned spaces, employing best practices in room design, proper temperature settings,
optimal rack and floor space densities and life cycle replacement of old and inefficient hardware. NASA
also achieved significant (approximately $4.0 million) cost savings and efficiencies by retiring NASA's
data center mainframe following the last planned Shuttle flight. While the Space Shuttle program was a
major customer of mainframe computing services, many older administrative systems also relied on those
services.
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CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
AGENCY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES (AITS)
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS PLANNED FOR FY 2013
AITS will invest in a technology upgrade for an electronic forms management system to replace NASA's
antiquated and unsupported software package for Agency forms management. The forms system will
manage over 5,000 forms and the system will be compatible with newer software, enable digital
certificate signatures, and comply with Section 508 requirements.
Federal e-Travel Services will migrate to a new service provider. An AITS and OCFO partnership will
implement and integrate the new end-to-end E-Travel solution.
BUDGET EXPLANATION
The FY 2013 request is $152.0 million. This represents a $7.1 million decrease from the FY 2012
estimate ($159.1 million). The FY 2013 request includes the support for consolidation of 100 Center-
based applications into ten enterprise services, saving IT service costs of $5 million per year in the out
years.
Projects
CONSOLIDATED CORPORATE NETWORK OPERATIONS CENTER
Consolidated Corporate Network Operations Center is building a seamless, integrated network operations
system and operations processes capable of managing the corporate end-to-end network.
NICS CONSOLIDATED CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
NICS Consolidated Configuration Management System includes management of servers, database, and
tools that will facilitate IT infrastructure library processes and procedures.
Both projects are scheduled to start January 1, 2012 and complete in July 2013.
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CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
AGENCY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES (AITS)
Program Schedule
Consolidated Corporated
Network Operations Center
(C2NOC)
Project Start
C2NOC Project Completion
01/2012
07/2013
NICS Consolidated
NC2MS
Configuration Management
Project Complete
System (NC2MS)
07/2013
Project Start
01/2012
Program Management & Commitments
NICS Consolidated Configuration Management System includes the formulation, implementation and
transition to operations of a consolidated NICS CM system. It also includes management of servers,
database, and tools that will facilitate IT infrastructure library processes and procedures.
Acquisition Strategy
AITS will continue to consolidate legacy contracts and data centers and increase the use of cloud
computing to align with strategies developed by the Administration.
Under the Web Enterprise Services Technologies contract solicitation acquisition, NASA will provide
contracts for cloud-based Web infrastructure that provides NASA with standards, open source, secure,
shared Web infrastructure and environment. The contract will provide solutions that are often cost
effective through the utilization of shared services, implementation of innovative solutions that are user
friendly, provide self service, and are readily accessible for the Agency's missions. The NASA Centers
and mission directorates will be able to utilize the consolidated infrastructure through existing
development contracts and still show value of cost effectiveness, improved customer service, and
compliance with Federal mandates.
CAS-27
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
STRATEGIC CAPABILITIES ASSETS PROGRAM (SCAP)
FY 2013 BUDGET
Actual Estimate
Notional
Budget Authority (in $ millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
FY 2013 President's Budget Request
29.4
29.3
28.0
28.0
28.0
28.0
28.0
Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-1.3
Percent Change From FY 2012 Estimate
--
--
-4.4%
Initiated in FY 2008, SCAP establishes an
alliance between all Centers with like assets,
makes recommendations on disposition of
capabilities no longer required, identifies re-
investment/re-capitalization requirements
within and among classes of assets, and
implements changes. SCAP reviews the
Agency's assets and capabilities each year to
ensure the requirements continue to be valid.
SCAP ensures test facilities identified as
essential by the Agency are in a state of
readiness. It maintains the skilled workforce
and performs essential preventative
maintenance to keep these facilities available
The Arc Jet Facility at ARC is sustained under the SCAP
funding as it is considered a critical asset to the Agency and
to meet program requirements. Core
the Nation. The facility provides extremely high power
capabilities supported within SCAP are
output to test articles for extreme space environmental
thermal vacuum chambers, simulators, and the
conditions during entry, descent, and landing. A thermal
protection system specimen is shown.
Arc Jet Facility.
SCAP will ensure maximum benefit across the Government by broadening its alliances outside of the
Agency for capabilities (e.g., thermal vacuum chambers). This has been accomplished by initiating a new
collaborative working group, the Space Environment Test Alliance Group, which includes NASA, DoD,
and other entities. The members gain awareness of capabilities across agencies, share best practices,
provide technical support, and refer test programs to facilities that are better suited. SCAP has established
a positive relationship between DoD and NASA in the arc jet test area.
CAS-28
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
STRATEGIC CAPABILITIES ASSETS PROGRAM (SCAP)
EXPLANATION OF MAJOR CHANGES FOR FY 2013
There are no program changes.
ACHIEVEMENTS IN FY 2011
NASA decided to consolidate its arc jet testing capabilities at ARC. SCAP began consolidation transition
planning of the JSC Arc Jet testing capability, which will shut down operations in FY 2013. NASA
anticipates annual operational cost savings of over $5 million per year through this consolidation effort.
SCAP completed and verified the new vibration test capability at the Space Power Facility at GRC's
Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, OH. The new vibration test capability includes the world's most
powerful reverberant acoustic test chamber and the world's most powerful mechanical vibration facility.
This new capability provides a one-stop-shop for a fully integrated spacecraft development and
qualification testing.
The Space Environment Test Alliance Group assisted the Science Mission Directorate by identifying
potential re-utilization of the K-Site thermal vacuum chamber at GRC Plum Brook Station for a Planetary
Surface Simulation Facility for Regolith testing. This resulted in a potential savings of up to $60 million
when compared to new construction within the Agency or in commercial industry.
KEY ACHIEVEMENTS PLANNED FOR FY 2013
SCAP will continue to sustain the strategic technical capabilities needed by NASA for successful
missions. SCAP will institute consistency in reimbursable pricing policies, perform quarterly program
performance reviews, continually improve business practices, and provides a forum for cooperation
between all Centers within asset classes.
SCAP will continue to develop and implement disposition plans for assets that are no longer needed.
CAS-29
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
STRATEGIC CAPABILITIES ASSETS PROGRAM (SCAP)
BUDGET EXPLANATION
The FY 2013 request is $28.0 million. This represents a $1.3 million decrease from the FY 2012 estimate
($29.3 million). The FY 2013 request includes:
*
$11.4 million for simulators to support NASA's aeronautics fundamental research and aviation
safety;
*
$6.6 million for thermal vacuum and acoustic chambers to support launch and space
environmental testing; and
*
$10.0 million for the Arc Jet to support simulation of high velocity atmospheric entry conditions
for design, development, test, and evaluation of thermal protective materials, vehicle structures,
and aerothermodynamics.
Projects
SIMULATORS
This capability includes an array of research and development crewed flight simulator assets at ARC and
LaRC that are in the operations phase. Simulators are critical components of the success of NASA's
aeronautics research in the areas of fundamental aeronautics and aviation safety. Principal assets include:
the vertical motion simulator at ARC, a large motion system, laboratories, and equipment, the Cockpit
Motion Facility at LaRC and its supporting suite of simulators (the differential maneuvering simulator
and the visual motion simulator), and central support facilities for aeronautics and spaceflight vehicle
research. These capabilities provide scientists and engineers with tools to explore, define, and resolve
issues in both vehicle design and missions operations.
THERMAL-VACUUM, VACUUM, AND ACOUSTIC CHAMBERS
This capability includes several assets that simulate conditions during launch and in space environments
at NASA facilities (GRC, GSFC, JPL, JSC, KSC, MSFC, and GRC Plum Brook Station). These assets
have minimum outline dimensions of 10 by10 feet and can accommodate a spacecraft. These chambers
have the capability of producing pressures down to 102 torr or lower and thermal shrouds capable of
liquid nitrogen temperatures or lower. Acoustic chambers are capable of generating approximately 150
decibels at frequencies in the range of 25 to 1000 Hertz. These chambers perform significant risk
mitigation for most of NASA payloads launched into space as well as many in other government agencies
such as NOAA and DoD.
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CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
STRATEGIC CAPABILITIES ASSETS PROGRAM (SCAP)
ARC JET
This capability includes assets that provide simulated high temperature, high velocity environments, and
that support the design, development, test, and evaluation activities of thermal protection materials,
vehicle structures, aerothermodynamics, and hypersonics at ARC and JSC. A gas (typically air) is heated
and accelerated to supersonic/hypersonic speeds by a continuous electrical arc. This high temperature gas
passes over a test sample, and produces an approximation of the surface temperature and pressure
environments experienced by a vehicle on atmospheric entry.
Arc jet testing has been critical in the safe return from orbit of space shuttles with tile damage; providing
essential validation of materials for the Mars entry missions such as Mars Science Laboratory. The
Dragon spacecraft, made by the commercial company Space Exploration Technologies, also completed its
heat shield development testing at NASA's Arc Jet Facility.
Program Schedule
Agency thermal
vacuum capability and
ARC arc jet capability
risk assessment
and risk assessment
TBD 2012
TBD 2013
Close JSC Arc Jet
Simulator capability
Facility
and risk assessment
TBD 2013
TBD 2014
CAS-31
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
STRATEGIC CAPABILITIES ASSETS PROGRAM (SCAP)
Program Management & Commitments
Project/Element
Provider
Simulators
Provider: ARC, LaRC
Project Management: ARC, LaRC
NASA Center: ARC, LaRC
Cost Share: DoD, FAA, commercial organizations
Thermal-Vacuum,
Provider: GRC, GSFC, JPL, JSC, MSFC
Vacuum, and
Project Management: GRC, GSFC, JPL, JSC, MSFC
Acoustic Chambers
NASA Center: GRC, GSFC, JPL, JSC, MSFC
Cost Share: DoD, commercial organizations
Arc Jets
Provider: ARC
Project Management: ARC
NASA Center: ARC
Cost Share: DoD, Commercial organizations
INDEPENDENT REVIEWS
NASA has extended the assessment schedule from bi-annual to tri-annual. This extension was necessary
due to budget challenges. Extending time between assessments was determined to pose the lowest risk to
program requirements within the allocated budget.
Review Type
Performer
Last Review
Purpose/Outcome
Next Review
Performance
Jacobs Engineering
9-Mar
Independent assessment of GSFC, JSC, and
2012
JPL thermal vacuum technical capability
and identify high risk areas
Performance
Jacobs Engineering
10-Sep
Independent assessment of ARC arc jet
2013
technical capability and identify high risk
areas
Performance
Jacobs Engineering
10-Jun
Independent assessment of GRC and
2013
MSFC thermal vacuum technical capability
and identify high risk areas
Performance
Jacobs Engineering
11-Mar
Independent assessment of ARC and LaRC
2014
simulator technical capability and identify
high risk areas
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CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
HEADQUARTERS BUDGET BY OFFICE
AGENCY MANAGEMENT BUDGET BY HEADQUARTERS OFFICE
Actual
Estimate
Notional
($ in millions in full cost)1
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
FY 2017
Science
27.8
28.6
27.6
27.6
27.6
27.6
27.6
Aeronautics Research
6.7
7.1
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
Space Technology
28.2
28.7
27.7
27.7
27.7
27.7
27.7
Human Exploration Office
5.2
5.8
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
Education
2.5
2.7
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
2.6
Mission Directorates
70.4
73.0
70.4
70.4
70.4
70.4
70.4
Office of the Administrator
29.7
28.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
23.5
Chief Engineer
4.6
4.7
4.6
4.6
4.6
4.6
4.6
Chief Financial Office
26.2
27.3
26.5
26.5
26.5
26.5
26.5
Chief Health and Medical Office
1.3
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
Chief Information Office
6.8
8.3
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.6
Chief Scientist
0.0
Communication
14.5
13.8
12.9
12.9
12.9
12.9
12.9
Diversity and Equal Opportunity
4.8
3.9
4.5
4.5
4.5
4.5
4.5
General Counsel
8.9
8.5
8.3
8.3
8.3
8.3
8.3
Independent Program and Cost Evaluation2
International and Interagency Relations
11.7
12.1
11.9
11.9
11.9
11.9
11.9
Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs
3.8
3.9
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
3.7
Safety and Mission Assurance
6.9
6.7
6.5
6.5
6.5
6.5
6.5
Small Business Programs
1.6
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.7
Staff Offices
120.8
120.9
114.0
114.0
114.0
114.0
114.0
Agy Operations/JPL NASA Mgt Office
6.1
6.4
8.2
8.2
8.2
8.2
8.2
Human Capital Mgt
30.3
30.2
29.2
29.2
29.2
29.2
29.2
Headquarters Operations
113.7
115.1
113.9
113.9
113.9
113.9
113.9
Strategic Infrastructure
16.5
16.3
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
15.0
Internal Controls and Mgt Systems
2.2
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
Procurement
7.1
7.2
7.1
7.1
7.1
7.1
7.1
Mission Support Directorate Front Office
4.1
2.7
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
NASA Shared Services Center
13.4
12.4
12.9
12.9
12.9
12.9
12.9
Protective Services
16.9
17.2
16.8
16.8
16.8
16.8
16.8
Mission Support
210.4
209.5
207.4
207.4
207.4
207.4
207.4
Total Agency Management
401.6
403.3
391.8
391.8
391.8
391.8
391.8
(1) In accordance with the President's proposal to implement a five-year non-security discretionary spending freeze, budget figures shown for
years after FY 2014 are notional and do not represent policy. Funding decisions will be made on a year-by-year basis.
(2) Starting in FY 2012, work content for the Independent Program and Cost Evaluation office was moved to the Office of Administrator.
CAS-33
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
HEADQUARTERS TRAVEL BUDGET BY OFFICE
HEADQUARTERS TRAVEL BUDGET BY OFFICE
Actual
Estimate
($ in millions)
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
Science
1.7
1.6
1.6
Aeronautics Research
0.8
0.6
0.6
Space Technology
1.2
1.2
1.2
Human Exploration Office
2.9
2.1
2.1
Education
0.3
0.5
0.5
Mission Directorates
6.8
6.0
6.0
Office of the Administrator1
0.4
1.2
1.2
Chief Engineer
1.2
0.9
0.9
Chief Financial Office
0.4
0.3
0.3
Chief Health and Medical Office
0.1
0.1
0.1
Chief Information Office
0.7
0.6
0.6
Communication
0.3
0.3
0.2
Diversity and Equal Opportunity
0.1
0.1
0.1
General Counsel
0.1
0.1
0.1
Independent Program and Cost Evaluation1
1.0
n/a
n/a
International and Interagency Relations
0.7
0.7
0.6
Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs
0.1
0.1
0.1
Safety and Mission Assurance
0.3
0.3
0.3
Small Business Programs
0.1
0.1
0.1
Staff Offices
5.4
4.6
4.5
Agency Operations/JPL NASA Management Office
0.1
0.1
0.1
Human Capital Management
1.3
1.0
0.9
Headquarters Operations
0.1
0.1
0.1
Strategic Infrastructure
0.4
0.5
0.4
Internal Controls and Management Systems
0.0
0.1
0.1
Procurement
0.1
0.2
0.2
Mission Support Directorate Front Office
0.2
0.2
0.1
Protective Services
0.2
0.1
0.1
Mission Support
2.4
2.2
1.9
Total Headquarters Travel Budget
14.6
12.8
12.4
(1) Starting in FY12, work content for the Independent Program and Cost Evaluation office was moved to the Office of Administrator.
CAS-34
CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT: AGENCY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
HEADQUARTERS FTE ASSIGNMENTS BY CENTER
CIVIL SERVANT FULL TIME EQUIVALENT DISTRIBUTION BY HEADQUARTERS
OFFICE
Actual
Estimate
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
Headquarters
Total
SES Non-
Contract
Total
SES Non-
Contract
Total
SES Non-
Contract
FTE
Career
WYE
FTE
Career
WYE
FTE
Career
WYE
SMD
160
22
58
155
19
50
155
19
50
ARMD
39
8
14
40
9
10
39
9
10
ST
30
3
3
32
1
4
32
1
4
HEO
164
15
28
164
18
76
158
18
76
EDUC
14
2
21
15
3
22
15
3
22
Mission Directorates
407
50
0
124
406
50
0
161
399
50
0
161
Office of the Administrator
25
5
8
0
63
12
8
12
63
12
8
12
Chief Engineer
25
8
26
24
8
15
24
8
15
CFO
105
9
1
40
104
9
1
35
104
9
1
35
CHMO
8
1
9
1
4
9
1
4
CIO
40
6
27
48
8
26
48
8
27
Communications
53
5
3
30
49
5
3
28
49
5
3
28
Diversity and Equal Opp.
19
3
7
18
3
3
18
3
3
GC
43
6
2
40
6
2
40
6
2
Ind. Prog. and Cost Eval.1
44
5
7
Int'l. and Inter-Agy Relations
52
7
6
52
7
6
52
7
6
Legis. and Intergov. Affairs
27
2
4
27
4
4
26
4
4
SMA
39
6
4
35
6
19
35
6
19
Small Business Programs
5
1
3
5
1
3
5
1
3
Staff Offices
485
64
18
150
474
70
18
151
473
70
18
152
NASA Mgt Office
25
1
6
27
1
2
25
1
2
Human Capital Mgt.
36
4
17
36
5
7
35
5
7
HQ Operations
105
3
324
111
4
304
104
4
293
Infrastructure
61
7
6
57
7
16
57
7
16
Int. Controls and Mgt. Sys.
10
1
1
10
0
1
9
0
1
Procurement
36
3
33
4
33
4
Msn. Supp. Dir. Front Ofc.
14
2
13
4
10
4
Protective Services
48
1
3
46
2
8
45
2
8
Mission Support
335
22
0
357
333
27
0
338
318
27
0
327
NASA HQ Total
1,227
136
18
631
1,213
147
18
650
1,190
147
18
640
(1) Starting in FY 2012, work content for the Independent Program and Cost Evaluation office was moved to the Office of Administrator.
CAS-35

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